Least of the Weevils

I think that the improbable and utterly unforeseen resolution to the current crisis in Parliament may have finally been hit upon.  The situation was quickly becoming a cluster of impossible options.

We can not have another election so soon after the last one, which was called prematurely to begin with and resulted in very little change.

Harper can not continue to govern without the confidence of the House, and has no prospects of winning it back.

Dion can not become Prime Minister of an unstable minority coalition after being thrashed in the election and being scheduled to resign in five months.  As much as I’ve enjoyed defending the democratic legitimacy of the proposed coalition, I think it’s becoming pretty clear that it will be a short-lived misadventure that is being savaged by the media and will therefore be rejected by the public. The coalition government will likely accomplish almost nothing during its short term except greatly strengthening the two parties that aren’t members.

Where does that leave us?  With one way out.The only realistically viable government given the current configuration of Parliament is a Conservative minority, led by someone other than Harper.

He won’t go willingly.  He was elected President, after all, and would never admit defeat at the hands of the top three people on his Enemies List.It is the responsibility of MPs from all parties to find a way to establish a stable government out of the results of the recent election.  That includes the Conservative caucus.

Their leader has failed the party, the Parliament, and the country.  His absurdly partisan economic update was followed by wiretapping an opposition caucus meeting.  If he takes the drastic (unprecedented?) step of prorogation to avoid a non-confidence vote, it would render him utterly unable to claim any democratic mandate.

Time to get out the old Thatcher hatchet.  Harper needs to be shown the door, and his own caucus is the only one able to do it.  It is their responsibility as the largest party in an unstable Parliament to present a government that can gain the confidence of just a small fraction of the opposition.  We’re all waiting, and don’t see one yet.  Off with its head!

Then, select a conciliatory interim Conservative leader that can approach the other Biggest Loser of the coalition scheme, Ignatieff.  All the new Conservative leader needs to do is convince Ignatieff to tell 11 of his supporters not to show up to take down the government when the opportunity arises.  Offered any reasonable deal to opt out of Dion’s Charge of the Light Brigade, Iggy will take it.

Canada gets a government that understands and accepts its obligation of responsibility to Parliament but appeases the expectations of the public, the Conservatives get to stay in power for a year or two while they select a permanent new leader, and Ignatieff gets his opportunity to rebuild the Liberal party into something credible.

Fire Harper.  A plan we can all get behind!

~Gnomes

Advertisements

4 Comments

  1. Manatee said,

    Tuesday, 2 December 2008 at 11:28 pm

    “We can not have another election so soon after the last one, which was called prematurely to begin with and resulted in very little change.”

    I agree that this is not a good option.

    “Harper can not continue to govern without the confidence of the House, and has no prospects of winning it back.”

    This is certainly true.

    “Dion can not become Prime Minister of an unstable minority coalition after being thrashed in the election and being scheduled to resign in five months.”

    I disagree with this. Let this be an important lesson for Canadians on how our system works. I see no reason why a government led by any other Conservative MP would be any more or less legitimate than Dion leading the coalition government. I see no reason why the media would treat it as more or less legitimate. If the coalition lasts for 18 months, so be it.

    “The coalition government will likely accomplish almost nothing during its short term except greatly strengthening the two parties that aren’t members.”

    The possibilities for winners and losers are endless. I certainly wouldn’t predicti the Conservatives and Bloc are sure winners…

  2. Gnomes said,

    Wednesday, 3 December 2008 at 12:04 am

    I’d certainly be happy to be proven wrong and have the coalition succeed in making its case for consensus-based government to the public. But from what I have seen so far, the media ranges from disapproving to rabidly hostile. In that scenario, I find it hard to believe that the coalition will be able to calmly educate the public on the finer points of Parliamentary democracy. Without public support, I don’t think it can be very stable. Though a prorogation could go a long way to discrediting Harper and consequently legitimizing the coalition while buying them more time.

  3. O'Smiley said,

    Wednesday, 3 December 2008 at 11:12 am

    I’ll throw in my two cents:

    “We can not have another election so soon after the last one, which was called prematurely to begin with and resulted in very little change.”

    I disagree, and believe that such has changed since the last election only weeks ago, that an election would produce different results, especially with concept of a coalition playing a role in the way people vote. Which way this would go I’m not convinced, however, I do believe, with the seriousness of both economic and political instability, Canadians would be more likely to produce a majority option, either Conservative or Liberal/NDP Coalition.

    “Harper can not continue to govern without the confidence of the House, and has no prospects of winning it back.”

    I think that it is not Harper that has lost the confidence in the House, but the Conservative policies in general. However, I would argue that as a whole, the policies of the Conservatives have not lost the confidence of the Canadian people in general. The Conservatives have not yet had a chance to really put their policies forward since the last election. The coalition was formed rather hastily before the ideas of cooperation and compromise, that all parties were spouting post election, could be utilized. Remember that polls had shown a definitive approval by Canadians of Harper as the best choice PM, and would agree with Gnomes that Dion is not a viable choice for PM. The election results really proved him to be the worst choice amongst Canadians, and was a direct result of ‘his’ choice to resign.

    “The coalition government will likely accomplish almost nothing during its short term except greatly strengthening the two parties that aren’t members.”

    I agree fully. I believe that the current economic downturn will be the downfall of what ever governing party is in place. The governing party will be the easy target of the Canadian people when looking for blame, and even with miraculous results the governing party will be hard pressed to produce a positive outcome.

    I think that if the Liberals were to wait it would be fairly easy for them to overturn the Conservative in mid to late 2009 and win a governing mandate in an election. However, if the Liberals/NDP take the reigns it will be theirs to lose, and the result will be in favor of the Conservatives. The Bloc and NDP have nothing to lose in this coalition. The Bloc will be able to further their separatist movement, and the NDP will be able to prove to Canadians who may have thought otherwise that they can form a viable governing option. The Liberals have everything to lose, and the Conservatives have really a lot to gain. A failed coalition will certainly prove a Conservative majority.

  4. Saturday, 9 April 2016 at 2:19 am

    I just got one of these (never used!) at a yard sale today and my 10 year daughter and I made chocolate donuts from the recipe book and followed the d Click http://s.intmainreturn0.com/bayy091615


Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: